Final (Un)Conference Photo Essay and Group Project

Group 16:

Andre- Photo Editor

Lindsey – Live Blogger

Khayla – Photographer

Susie- Quality Editor

Tow – Category Editor, Meta Editor

Missy- Interviewer

Selected metadata and tagged photos (6):

 

Photographer: Khayla Rooks

Summary and Explanation of photo choices:

These photos perfectly capture the culture of inclusion and learning fostered by the WWR (Un)Conference. Intimate, personal conversations took place here, as depicted in photos 2, 4, 5, 6; cross-cultural emotional support was provided here, as shown in the round-table setup in picture 5; and people learned of different cultures and struggles (both abroad and within the Seattle community), as depicted in pictures 1, 2, 4, 5. Black Mama, a figure depicted in two of the photos selected, serves as an important figure both in our class and in the broader social movement our class addresses. Women like her are leaders in the movement for change. This movement is about equality, not supremacy. This conference focuses on the need to men respect women, for women to recognize their power and utilize it to further the status of other women in their communities, and the need to end the unwanted sexualization and stereotyping of women around the globe.

Categories of photos:

1.) “The Altar”

Making Scenes

2.) Ixtlixochitl Salinas-Whitehawk discussion photo

Building Communities

3.) Ana Gabriela Cano (“Black Mama”) close-up 

Reel Rebels, Making Scenes, Write to Rock (professor in the photo)

4.) Kibibi Monie discussing with students

Building Communities

5.)  big round-table photo

Making Scenes, Reel Rebels

6.) Kibibi Monie, Ana Gabriela Cano, Julie C. discussion

Making Scenes, Reel Rebels

Explanation for categories:

1) The Altar photo demonstrates the work of the performers and people who work behind the scenes to make a difference in the world. These powerful women are working for change in their own way. The photos captured change the perspectives of the viewers and make people want to fight for these social-justice movements.

2) The photo of Ixtlixochitl Salinas-Whitehawk talking to another individual shows the intimate conversations between one another about the social justices we have discussed in class. By teaching others about her culture, beliefs, and the struggle she faces; she builds community to amplify the social justice platform.

3) The photo of Black Mama falls under a few different categories because of how influential she is. Black Mama is a feminist archivist who is a significant and powerful figure. She fights for justice for women and is the voice of those who cannot speak for themselves. She shows her passion and fight in the music she performs.

4) This picture of Kibibi Monie and another woman discussing material from the conference exemplifies “Building Communities” through an inclusivity fostered by shared music and the archive – factors that directly contribute to broadening the scope of the social justice movements we’ve discussed in class.

5) This photo includes people who “[make] scenes” and act as “Reel Rebels,” including artists who perform for social justice movements (gender and racial equality movements), people of the Seattle community that work “behind the scenes” to further these movements, and our professors who maintain an archive promoting equality.

6) Black Mama is a musician that creates a music scene; through her music, she creates a platform for discussion around racial and gender equality. Other women in the picture also serve as feminist archivistas (“Reel Rebels”), including our professors and students who helped contribute to documenting the movement.

Live Blog Posts:

https://womenwhorockcommunity.org/2018/03/10/wwr-group-16-live-blog-lindsey/

https://womenwhorockcommunity.org/2018/03/10/wwr-group-16-blog-post-2-lindsey/

Interviews:

Interviewer: Missy Peterson

1) What does this (Un)Conference mean to you?

2) What is most significant to you about the day?

Cynthia

1) Actually, I had no attachment to the conference. I just noticed it was going on and came to see what it was about. I wish I knew more of the background information so I knew what was happening. I would have planned my day differently so I could hear what everyone had to say about the different social justices going on and how they affect each individual. This event seems pretty cool and eye-opening.

2) I believe that women getting together to speak truth to power is significant. Most females won’t speak for themselves. Seeing such strong figures today made me realize the fight and passion that lives in them; it makes me see the desire they have for change in their communities.

Jessica

1) I found this conference to be extremely important because it discusses the problems with social justice, whether it be race or gender.  I didn’t really notice the way women were treated and the gender problems women face in different countries was as big of a issue as it is until attending the conference today. People need to realize that it is important for women to take up space. Women play a significant role in society everyday. The social justices women face today need to be resolved and differences need to be made. These powerful women opened my eyes today and changed my perspective on the situations at hand.

2) Today, I really got to see the fire behind each women. I got a chance to see what each of the represent. They have a voice and chops to use it to promote awareness to each of the social injustices that they are facing. All of the women that I saw speak today have educated me to be better and helped me understand that I can make a difference too.

What we learned from the (Un)Conference and from working as a group:

Throughout the quarter, group work was extremely important to understanding the complex ideas presented in sometimes dense academic articles. Without discussion, these articles would have remained largely a mystery to us. Yet, by compiling each of our takes on the articles, we came to a greater understanding of the messages portrayed and how they were applicable to our personal lives. Additionally, by working on the group website together, we came to a better understanding of contributions to a sort of online archive – something similar, in a sense, to the collaborative archive created by our professors.

The (Un)Conference was eye-opening in many ways. Everything we talked about in class seemed so broadly applicable, but when we came to the conference and heard directly from people in the Seattle community like Kibibi Monie, problems close to home began to feel a lot more real. Discussing the feelings of exclusion people feel even within the relatively inclusive haven of Seattle surprised us in many ways – it feels like we are leaps and bounds above the struggles women and minority communities have faced in the past; sometimes it’s hard to face the reality of how far we have left to go. This conference was one of those times where, when you begin to sit down and discuss things, you feel as if you had been living blindfolded in your own community. Sometimes ignorance is too comfortable; this conference helped bring things to light.

 

 

 

 

Interview

1) What does this (Un)Conference mean to you? 2) What is most significant to you about the day?

Cynthia
1) Actually, I had no attachment to the conference. I just noticed it was going on and came to see what it was about. I wish I knew more of the back ground information so I knew what was happening. I would have planned my day differently so I could hear what everyone had to say about the different social justices going on and how they affect each individual. This event seems pretty cool and eye-opening.
2) I believe that women getting together to speak truth to power is significant. Most females won’t speak for themselves. Seeing such strong figures today made me realize the fight and passion that lives in them; it makes me see the desire they have for change in their communities.

Jessica
1) I found this conference to be extremely important because it discusses the problems with social justice, whether it be race or gender.  I didn’t really notice the way women were treated and the gender problems women face in different countries was as big of a issue as it is until attending the conference today. People need to realize that it is important for women to take up space. Women play a significant role in society everyday. The social justices women face today need to be resolved and differences need to be made. These powerful women opened my eyes today and changed my perspective on the situations at hand.
2) Today, I really got to see the fire behind each women. I got a chance to see what each of the represent. They have a voice and chops to use it to promote awareness to each of the social injustices that they are facing. All of the women that I saw speak today have educated me to be better and helped me understand that I can make a difference too.

Work for Pictures 1-6

1.) The Altar. March 10, 2018. MOHAI.

Making Scenes

The Altar photo demonstrates the work of the performers and people who work behind the scenes to make a difference in the world. These powerful women are working for change in their own way. The photos captured change the perspectives of the viewers and make people want to fight in what they believe in.

2.) Ixtlixochitl Salinas-Whitehawk. March 10, 2018. MOHAI.

Building Communities

The photo of Ixtlixochitl Salinas-Whitehawk talking to another individual shows the intimate conversations between one another about the social justices we have discussed in class. Also, she teaches about her culture, struggles, and beliefs on the issues she deals with. She wants to amplify the social justices that are major issues today.

3.) Ana Gabriela Cano (“Black Mama”). March 10, 2018. MOHAI

Reel Rebels, Making Scenes, Write to Rock

The photo of Black Mama falls under a few different categories because of how influential she is. Black Mama is a feminist archivist who is a significant and powerful figure. She fights for justice for women and is the voice of those who cannot speak for themselves. She shows her passion and fight in the music she performs.

4.) Kibibi Monie. March 10, 2018. MOHAI.

Building Communities

This picture of Kibibi Monie and others discussing material from the conference exemplifies “Building Communities” through an inclusivity fostered by shared music and the archive – factors that directly contribute to broadening the scope of the social justice movements we’ve discussed in class.

5.) Ana Gabriela Cano (“Black Mama”), Julie C, Kibibi Monie. March 10, 2018. MOHAI.

Making Scenes, Reel Rebels

This photo includes people who “[make] scenes” and act as “Reel Rebels,” including artists who perform for social justice movements (gender and racial equality movements), people of the Seattle community that work “behind the scenes” to further these movements, and our professors who maintain an archive promoting equality.

 

6.) Ana Gabriela Cano (“Black Mama”), Julie C, Kibibi Monie. March 10, 2018. MOHAI.

Making Scenes, Reel Rebels

Black Mama is a musician that creates a music scene; through her music, she creates a platform for discussion around racial and gender equality. Other women in the picture also serve as feminist archivistas (“Reel Rebels”), including our professors and students who helped contribute to documenting the movement.

Final Class Today – Group Members Look at This.

Hey, I asked the professor what to do if we couldn’t meet up to finish this project, because we are supposed to be discussing stuff in class and figuring it all out. I couldn’t get ahold of you guys, so I asked if she had your emails or something (she ended up sending you all a message on Canvas including my email and phone number). As long as we get this assignment done, we will be fine. However, we are all graded on the same rubric, so if some people don’t complete their part, then we all lose points.

Here’s a link to what we were supposed to work on in class together. Scroll down to see “After the Women Who Rock (Un)Conference” section. Since no one is here, I think I’ll leave the classroom soon. Here is what I think we should do for the steps.

Step 1:

I like the photo of:

1.) the colorful picture stand

2.) The two women talking

3.) Black mama close up

4.) The very last photo of the post (bottom right)

5.) Any one of the big round-table photos

6.) The other photo with Black Mama in it

Why I chose these photos:

These photos perfectly capture the culture of inclusion and learning fostered by the WWR (Un)Conference. Intimate, personal conversations took place here, as depicted in photos 2, 4, 5, 6; cross-cultural emotional support was provided here, as shown in the round-table setup in picture 5; and people learned of different cultures and struggles (both abroad and within the Seattle community), as depicted in pictures 1, 2, 4, 5. Black Mama, a figure depicted in two of the photos selected, serves as an important figure both in our class and in the broader social movement our class addresses. Women like her are leaders in the movement for change. This movement is about equality, not supremacy. This conference focuses on the need to men respect women, for women to recognize their power and utilize it to further the status of other women in their communities, and the need to end the unwanted sexualization and stereotyping of women around the globe.

Step 2:

I worked off of this post:

https://group16afram337.wordpress.com/2018/03/15/photos-from-conference/

1.) the colorful picture stand

Making Scenes

2.) The two women talking

Building Communities

3.) Black mama close up

Reel Rebels, Making Scenes, Write to Rock (professor in the photo)

4.) The very last photo of the post (bottom right)

Building Communities

5.) Any one of the big round-table photos

Making Scenes, Reel Rebels

6.) The other photo with Black Mama in it

Making Scenes, Reel Rebels

“Reel Rebels” include “feminist archivistas,” including our professors and people in the WWR community. Pictures tagged as “Making Scenes” are performers and people who work behind the scenes to make a difference (picture 1 being an example of their work). “Write to Rock” includes those who write about social injustice. “Building Communities” are photos of spreading the social justice movement.

Someone: “explain your group’s categorization of the photos in no more than 50 words per photo.” Follow these guidelines:

Write to Rock features people who write about music, addressing overlapping audiences through the popular and underground press, the academy and the blogosphere. These writers question conventional stories of popular music and cultural production that erase the influence of women and women of color. They ask us to consider how we narrate the past and the present with regard to particular performers, genres, and sounds. They offer feminist histories and accounts, creating new methods, formats, platforms and frameworks for understanding popular music.

Reel Rebels features filmmakers, audio producers, sound designers, visual artists, photographers, and radio hosts–people we call feminist archivistas. They use multiple forms of media to document, create, and distribute stories about popular music, community-making and social activism.

Building Communities features people who have used music and performance to build social justice movements. They work in various local and transnational communities within the Americas and beyond.

Making Scenes features people who make music scenes: from people who perform, produce, and work at record labels to people who run venues, book shows, and manage bands, as well as the fans who make scenes come alive. They work on the stage, at the club, in the studio, on the laptop, behind the bar, at the copy shop, on the air waves, and behind the scenes.

 

6 Photos selected